Tag Archives: Ace Frehley

Paul Stanley’s inspirational quote of the week

Part inspiration, part perspiration and part showman, Paul Stanley is one of rock’s ultimate frontmen, a persona so grand, I’ve dubbed him “The Walt Disney of Rock and Roll.”

Stanley’s lyrics are filled with imagery – visceral and inspirational. It’s the latter that’s inspired a new feature for this blog:

Paul Stanley’s inspirational quote of the week.

Every week, we’ll draw inspiration from Stanley’s often over-the-top lyrics. Apply them in life, and happiness is guaranteed.

“I know life sometimes can get tough!
And I know life sometimes can be a drag!
But people, we have been given a gift,
we have been given a road
And that road’s name is… Rock and Roll!”

There, feeling better?

Concert review: Ace Frehley invades Greensburg

Ace Frehley’s reputation as a rock and roll wildman is well-deserved. The former lead guitarist of KISS is as heralded for his exploits away from the stage as the RnR Hall of Fame-caliber licks he delivers on it.

But that reputation is in need of a makeover.

There's still something magical about an Ace Frehley guitar solo.

There’s still something magical about an Ace Frehley guitar solo.

It’s been years since Frehley lost his sobriety, and, as he and his backing band hit Greensburg’s Palce Theater Saturday night for the third gig on his Space Invader tour, which backs an album of the same name, it’s apparent Frehley takes his business seriously. Granted, he didn’t hit the stage until about 10 p.m., but it didn’t take long for the original Spaceman to captivate the crowd his high-decibel rock.

Frehley’s set list at the Palace Theater (11/15/14): Lost in Limbo, Gimme a Feelin’, Toys, Parasite, Snowblind, Love Gun, Breakout, Space Invader, King of the Night Time World, Strutter, Bass solo, Strange Ways, Rock Soldiers, New York Groove, Shock Me, Guitar solo, Rocket Ride, 2 Young 2 Die, Shot Full of Rock. Encore: Detroit Rock City, Cold Gin, Deuce.

One thing is certain at a Frehley concert – volume. Chances are your ears will still be ringing the next morning. But the blasts of volume aren’t disguising anything with Ace’s outfit, which includes drummer Scot Coogan, bassist Chris Wyse and guitarist Richie Scarlett. It’s an outstanding group, particularly the talented Coogan, who handled vocals on multiple KISS songs.

Ace Frehley's rock soldiers at the Palace Theater in Greensburg,

Ace Frehley’s rock soldiers at the Palace Theater in Greensburg,

And Frehley doesn’t shy away from his past. The setlist is loaded with KISS classics, some of which Frehley had a hand in writing. Love Gun, with Coogan’s searing Stanleyesque vocals, was a highlight. King of the Night Time World, an underplayed KISS classic, was a pleasant surprise. Strutter rocked hard. And the encore, a triple-shot of KISS classics, including Cold Gin, the first song Frehley wrote for the band, left the crowd satisfied.

Frehley ran through songs from his solo work and Frehley’s Comet. The epic Rock Soldiers stood tall.

And so did Frehley.

His playing his sharp. No doubt years of sobriety are treating him well. His confidence is evident, and his new material stands up well with the songs that keep people turning out to see the 63-year-old, who entered the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame earlier this year along with the other original members of KISS. During the induction ceremony, Frehley drew the loudest cheers from the audience. His popularity has rarely waned whether he’s playing in KISS or not.

No doubt, Frehley has another tour or two left in him. Chances are his rock soldiers will demand it.

Ace Frehley: No Regrets

Awk!

Ace Frehley has maintained his sobriety for years. I read parts of his books while drinking sangria.

Ace Frehley has maintained his sobriety for years. I read parts of his books while drinking sangria.

Ace Frehley used that expression frequently in interviews during the heyday of KISS, which occurred in the mid to late 1970s. Awk was part crutch, as Frehley struggled in social settings for years. It was also part asshole, the creation of someone often obliterated on alcohol and cocaine. Frehley said, “Awk,” so often, it was originally the only speaking line given to him for “KISS Meets Phantom of the Park” – a movie so awful even Gene Simmons might deny being involved. Frehley wasn’t pleased, and his dialogue was eventually reworked, even as the original lead guitarist of the recent inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame used filming as an excuse to snort coke and be merry around Los Angeles.

This much, and many other intimacies of Frehley’s life in and beyond KISS were revealed in No Regrets, which was released in 2011. Frehley was sober for nearly five years at the time of releasing the book, which he received help from Joe Layden and John Ostrosky.

Frehley admits his memory isn’t sharp. “Let’s face it – my memory isn’t what it used to be. Speaking with old friends and coworkers jarred my memory, allowing me to recapture the true flavor of some of the stories within these pages.” 

But Frehley remembers enough, and, after reading, it’s amazing the man is still alive let alone touring. (Full disclosure: I’ll be hitting Ace’s Nov. 15 show at the Palace Theater in Greensburg and have traveled to other states to see the legend do his thing.)

Frehley takes us from his time in grade school to his work with bands pre-KISS. Frehley once drank too much at a Grateful Dead show, where he worked his way backstage and came within a few feet of legendary Jerry Garcia, whom Frehley described as “down to earth” despite being one of rock’s biggest stars at the time. He woke up at the venue to discover he was alone and locked inside.

Frehley’s true excess began in earnest once KISS became a money-making machine shortly after the release of Alive. Frehley drank. Frehley snorted. Frehley cavorted (though this book makes no mentions of his alleged bisexual escapades that Peter Criss addressed in his autobiography.) Frehley had multiple brushes with death, was pulled over driving drunk by police on several occasions and destroyed relationships along the way.

But as he was ruining his life, KISS kept them in theirs, mostly because Frehley was worshipped by fans. Frehley reveals that, contrary to what Simmons and Paul Stanley say as time passes, he voluntarily left KISS – not once, but twice. The latter came after a highly successful reunion spurred by KISS’ appearance on MTV’s Unplugged and was fueled when, according to Frehley, Simmons snubbed him by cutting scenes of his daughter from the movie Detroit Rock City.

Among other tidbits revealed by Frehley – he was close friends with John Belushi, he dislikes Tommy Thayer, delights that his KISS solo album was better than and outperformed his bandmates’ releases and is rightfully proud of his work with KISS with a few exceptions like Music From the Elder.

Frehley’s book doesn’t hit hard. He doesn’t come across as bitter or whiny, and it appears he really wants to make the reader realize he’s just a likeable, happy-go-lucky guy who wants you to like him like everyone else does..

Finally, toward the end of the book, Frehley does let it fly.

“Since 2001, every move KISS has made has been premeditated and part of a well-orchestrated plan. Nothing, including their attempts to minimize my contributions, has been left to chance.

So, you might wonder now, ‘How does Ace feel about Kiss today?’ (Notice he didn’t use all caps here.)

Fair enough. Here’s my response: 

At this point in my life, I just need to let things go. Holding on to resentments can really make you ill, so I’ll leave the dirty work to my attorneys. I can sum up the KISS situation in just five simple words: ‘What goes around, comes around. No matter what happens, I’ll be just fine.

That being said, in reality, I think they’re just a bunch of dirty rotten whores. Awk!”

While Frehley tries hard to comes across as likable, it’s not something he needs to sell. Just watch the band’s induction into the rock hall and listen to the crowd roar in approval when Tom Morello mentions his guitar hero, “Ace Frehley.” There’s something about Ace that makes people root for him, and that’s what makes you crack a smile when you’ve finished this book.

What I learned last week

With an incredible run of pleasant, warm and dry weather in Western Pennsylvania, just couldn’t get a recent letter to the editor submitted to and published by the Observer-Reporter out of my head.

In the letter, the author recalls how football used to be football – filled with hard hits, actual defense, suspense and unpredictablility. While the author may have a point (I still enjoy watching the occasional professional or collegiate contest), what cranked my mindshaft was his current preferences to watching sports.

Part of Thursday afternoon was spent walking around Twin Lakes, one of Westmoreland County's treasures.

Part of Thursday afternoon was spent walking around Twin Lakes, one of Westmoreland County’s treasures.

Walks on the beach.

The tide was high while vacationing at Swan Beach, N.C., in late Septmber, but walking along the beach was still worth it.

The tide was high while vacationing at Swan Beach, N.C., in late Septmber, but walking along the beach was still worth it.

Enjoying the fall scenery.

Strolling through town, talking to acquiantances and stopping by a few local shops.

Just couldn’t get out of my mind how spot on this letter was. It hit just the right nerve. And the recent run of whether provided a perfect backdrop to prove the point.

Technically, this wasn’t learned the past week, but there was certainly a reconnection with things like trimming trees, mowing grass, taking the dog for a 3-mile walk instead of a 20-minute outing and smelling the fall air. I didn’t watch a minute of the Pitt football game (thank goodness!) or pay much attention to the end of the major league season. I wasn’t parked on the couch for the Steelers-Bucs game, though I readily admit I pay a bit too much attention to my fantasy football and baseball teams.

When the weather worsens, the plan is to move the activity inside. As a homeowner, there’s always work that needs done.

  • A long-standing goal is to run a marathon and, hopefully, run it well. I’m a bit of a fitness nut, so it’s not a shock to the system to intensify training to accomplish this goal, which I put in writing on Facebook. Well, I recently committed to being part of a relay team for the Pittsburgh Marathon, and plan on running the entire race. I’m stoked for the challenge.
  • Acts of kindness go a long way. Don’t believe me? Just scroll down an entry on this blog to find out how.
  • Ace Frehley is coming to Greensburg! His gig is scheduled for Nov. 15 at the Palace Theater, an excellent venue without a bad seat. I’ll be there.
  • Having a head cold sucks for many reasons but the primary one, right now, is it slowed the search for the perfect pumpkin beer.